Oral Infection Clinical Research

Porphyromonas gingivalis in Alzheimer’s disease brains: Evidence for disease causation and treatment with small-molecule inhibitors

January 2019

Source: Science Magazine

 

Abstract:  Porphyromonas gingivalis, the keystone pathogen in chronic periodontitis, was identified in the brain of Alzheimer’s disease patients. Toxic proteases from the bacterium called gingipains were also identified in the brain of Alzheimer’s patients, and levels correlated with tau and ubiquitin pathology. Oral P. gingivalis infection in mice resulted in brain colonization and increased production of Aβ1–42, a component of amyloid plaques. Further, gingipains were neurotoxic in vivo and in vitro, exerting detrimental effects on tau, a protein needed for normal neuronal function. To block this neurotoxicity, we designed and synthesized small-molecule inhibitors targeting gingipains. Gingipain inhibition reduced the bacterial load of an established P. gingivalisbrain infection, blocked Aβ1–42 production, reduced neuroinflammation, and rescued neurons in the hippocampus. These data suggest that gingipain inhibitors could be valuable for treating P. gingivalis brain colonization and neurodegeneration in Alzheimer’s disease.

Certain Oral Bacteria Associated with Increased Pancreatic Cancer Risk

April 2016

Source: American Association for Cancer Research

 

Quote from Researcher: “We found that Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, two species of bacteria linked to periodontal disease, were associated with a more than 50 percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer,” Ahn continued. “These data do not show a causal relationship, but they are the first steps in understanding a potential new risk factor for pancreatic cancer, which is vital if we are to develop new approaches for pancreatic cancer prevention and early detection in the future.”

Oral Bacteria and Cancer 

March 10, 2014

Source: National Center for Biotechnology Information

 

Quote from Researcher: “We found that Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, two species of bacteria linked to periodontal disease, were associated with a more than 50 percent increased risk of pancreatic cancer,” Ahn continued. “These data do not show a causal relationship, but they are the first steps in understanding a potential new risk factor for pancreatic cancer, which is vital if we are to develop new approaches for pancreatic cancer prevention and early detection in the future.”

Periodontitis and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

July 2009

Source: American Journal of Cardiology

 

Summary: This authors of this renowned research article from 2009 explain, “This aim of this document is to provide health professionals, especially cardiologists and periodontists, a better understanding of the link between atherosclerotic CVD and periodontitis and, on the basis of current information, an approach to reducing the risk for primary and secondary atherosclerotic CVD events in patients with periodontitis.”